FIDELIO-DKD trial renders Kerendia (finerenone) the FDA approval

The study also compared the two groups for the number of patients who experienced cardiovascular death, a non-fatal heart attack, non-fatal stroke, or hospitalization for heart failure. Results showed that 367 of the 2,833 patients receiving Kerendia had at least one of the events in the composite endpoint compared to 420 of the 2,841 patients who received a placebo, with the treatment showing a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular death, non-fatal heart attack, and hospitalization for heart failure.

FDA

FDA facilitates new treatments for COVID-19

The FDA has been working closely with other government agencies and academic centers that are investigating the use of the drug CHLOROQUINE, which is already approved for treating malaria, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, to determine whether it can be used to treat patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 to potentially reduce the duration of symptoms, as well as viral shedding, which can help prevent the spread of disease. Studies are underway to determine the efficacy of using chloroquine to treat COVID-19.

FDA

FDA Approval: point of care testing for COVID-19

The test we’re authorizing today will be able to provide Americans with results within hours, rather than days like the existing tests, and the company plans to roll it out by March 30, which is an incredibly rapid timeline for such an effort. With new tools like point-of-care diagnostics, we are moving into a new phase of testing, where tests will be much more easily accessible to Americans who need them.

With the development of point of care diagnostics, Americans who need tests will be able to get results faster than ever before. More and more options for reliable, convenient testing are becoming available at an incredibly rapid pace, thanks to the hard work of our FDA team and the ingenuity of the American industry.

Today marks an important step in expanding the availability of testing and, importantly, rapid results. Point-of-care testing means that results are delivered to patients in the patient care settings, like hospitals, urgent care centers, and emergency rooms, instead of samples being sent to a laboratory. With today’s authorization, there is now an option for testing at the point of care, which enables patient access to more immediate results.

FDA

FDA guidance on diabetes safety clinical trials

In 2008, the Food and Drug Administration mandated the pharmaceutical industry to prove cardiovascular safety for all new anti-diabetes medications. As a consequence, we presently have critically useful safety data from clinical trials like LEADER, SUSTAIN, CANVAS, PIONEER 6, DECLARE-TIMI 58, and REWIND.

The FDA has now issued a new draft recommendation to broaden the above requirement by including safety clinical trials for nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy, and sleep apnea, in addition to ischemic atherosclerosis. The rationale is that the above non-ASCVD complications can also increase the mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Although recommendations have not been specified or finalized, they will change the landscape of anti-diabetes clinical research for the next 15 years. Stay tuned.

GT

New FDA approval: oral medication for Cushing’s disease

Cushing’s syndrome (CS) is a rare condition. It’s health consequences can be severe, leading to visceral adiposity, muscle weakness, depression, insulin resistance, diabetes, blood clots, reduced immune system, and cardiovascular disease.

A portion of patients diagnosed with CS has Cushing’s disease (CD). In Cushing’s disease, the root cause of hypercortisolism is a pituitary tumor producing excessive ACTH hormone. The preferred treatment is pituitary surgery. Unfortunately, in a small subset of patients, the operation is not successful or indicated.

To address the health concerns for individuals who are not responsive or candidates for pituitary tumor resection, the FDA has now approved a backup treatment via the oral drug Isturisa.

Isturisa, taken twice daily, is a potent inhibitor of 11-β-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in cortisol production. Side effects can include relative adrenal insufficiency, swelling, nausea, vomiting, and headaches. Clinical studies have shown that about 50% of patients respond to therapy.

Isturisa is an excellent addition to the arsenal of combating refractory Cushing’s disease.

Dr. Tashko

New FDA approval: fish oil (vascepa) for cardiovascular risk reduction

Vascepa is a form of omega-3 fish oil named icosapent ethyl. It was first approved by the FDA in 2012 for the treatment of severe hypertriglyceridemia, as defined by blood triglyceride levels >500 mg/dL.

The FDA has now added a second indication for Vascepa. It can be utilized in patients with established cardiovascular disease or in those who have diabetes plus two or more other risk factors (e.g., hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, kidney dysfunction) for cardiovascular disorder. Before treatment, patients must also have baseline triglyceride measures >150 mg/dL.

This significant approval comes after reviewing the results of REDUCE-IT, a landmark randomized clinical trial published in NEJM, January 2019. REDUCE-IT confirmed significant cardiovascular outcome reduction of 25% in patients receiving icosapent ethyl when added to statin therapy.

I anticipate widespread use of the fish oil, icosapent ethyl, especially in patients with diabetes, who, by its nature of insulin resistance, frequently have both the increased risk of ASCVD and high triglycerides. Clinicians should be aware of possible induction or worsening of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and bleeding with Vascepa, particularly in the predisposed individuals.

GT

New FDA approval: glucagon nasal powder for severe hypoglycemia

Although uncommon, severe hypoglycemia can be devastating. It can occur in patients with type 1 diabetes or those with type 2 diabetes receiving insulin or sulfonylurea. If a patient experiences loss of consciousness or seizure from profound low sugars, glucagon needs to be administered immediately by a friend, family member, or caregiver.

The FDA has now approved a glucagon nasal powder as the second form of glucagon delivery for patients with severe hypoglycemia. In clinical trials, glucagon nasal spray has demonstrated similar efficacy as the injectable counterpart in increasing blood glucose concentrations.

The glucagon nasal powder is an excellent additional tool to combat severely low sugars in individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It has been approved for patients age four or older.

GT

New FDA approval: semaglutide, the first oral GLP-1 agonist for type 2 diabetes

The FDA has now approved the first oral semaglutide, Rybelsus, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This approval marks a breakthrough advancement in the field of clinical diabetology. Rybelsus is the first “protein” based molecule to be administered orally and not subcutaneously via an injection.

Oral administration of semaglutide is made possible through the use of SNAC compound. SNAC helps escort and transport the semaglutide intact across the gastrointestinal epithelial cells. It assists in bypassing the harsh acidic environment of the stomach.

Various clinical trials, under the name PIONEER, have consistently shown A1c improvements and weight loss benefits with Rybelsus – thus leading to this landmark FDA acceptance.

Rybelsus comes at three doses; 3, 7, and 14 milligrams. Patients should start at 3 mg per day for one month before advancing to the 7 mg, and if needed, to the 14 mg daily dosage. Rybelsus should be taken in an empty stomach, with no more than 4 ounces of plain water, and at least 30 minutes before breakfast.

Similar to other GLP-1 agonists, oral semaglutide can cause gastrointestinal side effects like nausea and diarrhea. Providers should be cautious when prescribing Rybelsus in those with a predisposed risk for pancreatitis, diabetic retinopathy, or kidney injury. It should not be prescribed in people with a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

GT

Vyleesi for hypoactive sexual desire disorder

Vyleesi has been approved for generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in women younger than age 50. It is self-injected subcutaneously 45 minutes prior to the anticipated sexual intercourse. It should not be used more than 8 times per month and more than once daily. In a short-term randomized clinical trial, Vyleesi performed better than placebo. Although Vyleesi activates melanocortin receptors, its precise mechanism of action in HSDD is unknown.

Side effects include increased blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, headache, and darkening of the gums. It should be avoided in patients with uncontrolled hypertension or cardiovascular disease. This approval occurs in the context of FDA’s 2012 ruling of considering female sexual dysfunction as one of the top 20 high priority conditions. Its cost and health insurance coverage will determine its accessibility and usage.

GT

New FDA Approval: hydrogel capsule for weight loss

About 450 overweight or obese adults with BMI 27-40 kg/m2 were randomized to receive Gelesis100 or placebo. Subjects were followed for 6 months. At the end of the trial, patients receiving Gelesis100 lost a significant amount of weight compared to placebo group: about 60% and 25% of the adults lost ≥5% (≥10 lbs) and ≥10% (≥20 lbs) body weight.

Gelesis100 comes in a capsule form. It is taken with plenty of water twice daily before meals. The capsule contains particles, that in the presence of water, have the capability of expanding massively in the stomach, thus triggering a sense of fullness and decreased appetite.

The particles are not absorbed in the bloodstream. No serious adverse events were seen. Gastrointestinal upset was the most common side effect.

GT

New FDA Approval: romosozumab for osteoporosis

Romosozumab , brand name Evenity, has now been approved by the FDA as a viable option for patients with advanced osteoporosis.

Romosozumab is a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits sclerostin. The approval comes with a major black box warning as the sclerostin inhibitor elevates the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular deaths.

Prior to Evenity initiation, patients need to be screened carefully for background cardiovascular disease. As the prevalence of both CVD and osteoporosis increases with age, the most likely candidates for such a therapy would be those at the highest risk for fragility or compression fractures.

GT

New FDA approval: oral testosterone

In March 2019 FDA approved the first oral testosterone supplementation for male patients with documented central (primary) or peripheral (secondary) hypogonadism. The medication is given twice a day orally. The recommended starting dose is about 250 mg every 12 hours. The minimum dose is about 150 mg BID with a maximum dose of 400 mg BID.

Follow up blood work needs to be done at least 7 days after initiation and 6 hours after the morning dose. Side effects may include elevated blood pressure, increased red blood cell mass, prostate enlargement, and GI upset. The approval comes with a black box warning for increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular events.

GT